LAB – ID: a digital tool to investigate corruption and transnational crime

In developing countries, money laundering sums a total of 800,000 to 950,000 billion dollars per year. Mexico moves 47,561 millions. Costa Rica ,6,370. Panama, 3,987. These figures come from organized crime, corruption and tax fraud as reported by the United Nations and Global Financial Integrity (GFI). Illegal businesses prevail, huge and covert, by the lack of sophistication of investigations and the little information available on companies operating in tax havens.

In developing countries, money laundering sums a total of 800,000 to 950,000 billion dollars per year. Mexico moves 47,561 millions. Costa Rica ,6,370. Panama, 3,987. These figures come from organized crime, corruption and tax fraud as reported by UN and Global Financial Integrity (GFI). Illegal businesses prevail, huge and covert, by the lack of sophistication of investigations and the little information available on companies operating in tax havens.

It is a global phenomenon. Criminals and corrupt officials do not keep the money in the place where stolen: they put it in banks or investments abroad.

How to find out if the president or members of its Government launder money in another country, if there is no open data, freely available online or if there is no possibility of access to records? How to follow the money trail when others want to hide it?

With those questions in mind, journalists Paul Radu (OCCRP) and Justin Arenstein (ANCIR) tracked and gathered information scattered in many different places. They devised a streamlined interface that allows a simple search to access to this data. More than 400 databases were gathered and information about people of interest and their businesses connections. They also added more services for journalists, activists and researchers and made it available in the Investigative Dashboard (ID). A platform that facilitates access to information and track the financial and business information in different countries.

Investigativedashboard.org helps investigators expose illicit ties that cross borders.

The use of ID helped to reveal, for example, the interests of the President of Azerbaijan in Panama: three Panamanian corporations hide the properties of the first family in the controversial gold mines of Chovdar.

Now, the Investigative Dashboard will be available in Spanish. Its translation is one of the components of the Investigative Reporting Initiative in the Americas. In addition, one person of CONNECTAS team will be based in Panama as data researcher to support the ID platform.

The ID has three sections: crowd-sourced database of information and documents on persons of interest and their business connections, a worldwide list of online databases and business registries, and a Research Desk where journalists can go for help in sourcing hard to find information.

In the first section, you only need to enter a name and the ID reveals corporations, positions, places and business connections related to it. If more information is needed, on the list of online databases you can expand your search by entering a business records and companies from all over the world. In the Research Desk, you can send a query to a specialist who will work with ID data researchers in different countries to support your journalistic investigation seeking information beyond the borders.

In developing countries, money laundering sums a total of 800,000 to 950,000 billion dollars per year. Mexico moves 47,561 millions. Costa Rica ,6,370. Panama, 3,987. These figures come from organized crime, corruption and tax fraud as reported by the United Nations and Global Financial Integrity (GFI). Illegal businesses prevail, huge and covert, by the lack of sophistication of investigations and the little information available on companies operating in tax havens.


In developing countries, money laundering sums a total of 800,000 to 950,000 billion dollars per year. Mexico moves 47,561 millions. Costa Rica ,6,370. Panama, 3,987. These figures come from organized crime, corruption and tax fraud as reported by UN and Global Financial Integrity (GFI). Illegal businesses prevail, huge and covert, by the lack of sophistication of investigations and the little information available on companies operating in tax havens.

It is a global phenomenon. Criminals and corrupt officials do not keep the money in the place where stolen: they put it in banks or investments abroad.


How to find out if the president or members of its Government launder money in another country, if there is no open data, freely available online or if there is no possibility of access to records? How to follow the money trail when others want to hide it?

With those questions in mind, journalists Paul Radu (OCCRP) and Justin Arenstein (ANCIR) tracked and gathered information scattered in many different places. They devised a streamlined interface that allows a simple search to access to this data. More than 400 databases were gathered and information about people of interest and their businesses connections. They also added more services for journalists, activists and researchers and made it available in the Investigative Dashboard (ID). A platform that facilitates access to information and track the financial and business information in different countries.

Investigativedashboard.org helps investigators expose illicit ties that cross borders.

The use of ID helped to reveal, for example, the interests of the President of Azerbaijan in Panama: three Panamanian corporations hide the properties of the first family in the controversial gold mines of Chovdar.

Now, the Investigative Dashboard will be available in Spanish. Its translation is one of the components of the Investigative Reporting Initiative in the Americas. In addition, one person of CONNECTAS team will be based in Panama as data researcher to support the ID platform.

The ID has three sections: crowd-sourced database of information and documents on persons of interest and their business connections, a worldwide list of online databases and business registries, and a Research Desk where journalists can go for help in sourcing hard to find information.


In the first section, you only need to enter a name and the ID reveals corporations, positions, places and business connections related to it. If more information is needed, on the list of online databases you can expand your search by entering a business records and companies from all over the world. In the Research Desk, you can send a query to a specialist who will work with ID data researchers in different countries to support your journalistic investigation seeking information beyond the borders.

Deje un comentario

Por favor ingrese su comentario
Por favor ingrese su nombre acá